SPITTING IMAGE | THE BRITISH ROYAL FAMILY | BUCKINGHAM PALACE 1984

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Description

A group portrait of ‘The British Royal Family’ Spitting Image puppets outside Buckingham Palace. Photographed by Arthur Steel.

Notes: Image unearthed October 2018.

Arthur Recalls: “I had the idea and thought that it could be a winner, so I telephoned Peter Fluck, one of the Spitting Image creators and put the idea across to him. He saw the opportunity for a humorous publicity stunt, so immediately arranged for a van to transport the puppets and dropped them directly outside the Palace, where I was in waiting. I just love the way that Princess Diana is shyly looking into camera.”

Camera: Leica 35mm.
Film stock: Kodak Tri-X Pan.
Location: Buckingham Palace, London.
Date: 14th June 1984.
Collection: Platinum.
Print Type: Fibre-based Harman Galerie FB Digital.
Printed by: Metro Imaging.
Bespoke: All prints are bespoke and printed to order.
Limited Editions:
All prints are limited editions and no further prints are produced once sold.
60″ prints / edition of 5
50″ prints / edition of 10
40″ prints / edition of 20
30″ prints / edition of 30
20″ prints / edition of 50
12″ prints / edition of 50
Presentation: 12 and 20 inch prints are titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper, supplied flat in an acid free 4mm 3-ply box for delivery and storage purposes. The boxes are ideal for gift wrapping. The larger 30, 40, 50 and 60 inch prints are also titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper and inserted into a rigid 4mm thick protective cardboard tube for delivery.
Delivery: Metro Imaging based in Central London use an experienced shipping service to deliver the boxed and rolled prints. Metro take great care in ensuring the print(s) are very well protected and efficiently delivered anywhere in the UK or overseas. Acid free tissue paper protects prints from scratching/creasing. Metro also offer a vast array of delivery options to suit the recipient’s preference.
Optional Dry Mounting: Professional Dry Mounting of the larger print sizes can be arranged at an additional cost, the print would then be perfectly flat and ready for framing. However, this makes the overall size very bulky for transporting, so, it may be best for us to send a rolled print directly to your framers and let them carry out the works. You just need to make sure that they are insured as we cannot take responsibility for any damages that may occur.
Certificate of Authenticity: Each print acquired from The Arthur Steel Archive is accompanied by an individually signed Certificate of Authenticity.
Video of Authenticity: Newly printed bespoke prints are further authenticated by way of a short personalised video. Arthur Steel mentions your name on the recording prior to signing. For example, Arthur will say something like: “I’m signing this print of the Spitting Image Royal Family, edition number 2/20 for Mr. Smith in New York.” For your records, the footage is then sent to you via email.
Watermark: Watermarks will not be present on an original print.
Copyright: © Arthur Steel / The Arthur Steel Archive.

Spitting Image was a British satirical puppet show, created by Peter FluckRoger Law and Martin Lambie-Nairn. The series was produced by ‘Spitting Image Productions’ for Central Independent Television over 18 series which aired on the ITV network. The series was nominated and won numerous awards during its run including ten BAFTA Television Awards, one for editing in 1989 and two Emmy Awards in 1985 and 1986 in the Popular Arts Category.

The series featured puppet caricatures of celebrities prominent during the 1980s and 1990s, including British Prime Ministers Margaret Thatcher and John Major and other politicians, US president Ronald Reagan, and the British Royal Family; the series was the first to caricature Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother (as an elderly gin-drinker with a Beryl Reid voice).

One of the most-watched shows of the 1980s and early 1990s, the series was a satire of politics, entertainment, sport and British culture of the era, and at its peak it was watched by 15 million people.