ITALIAN PRIEST | ST. PETER’S BASILICA | ROME 1971

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Description

An Italian Priest stops on the steps of the Vatican to observe passers-by, St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome.

Note: Image unearthed January 2013.

Arthur recalls: “I was in Rome to cover an odd story about the fact that tourists who were showing their bare arms were being refused entry into the Vatican. Outside there were salesmen cashing in on this and were selling long sleeve shirts. It was on this trip that I spotted this Italian Priest wearing his Cappello Romano. He was just stood there, on the steps of the Vatican observing people, I thought, what a incredible character.”

Camera: Leicaflex SL2 35mm, 180mm lens.
Film stock:
 Kodak Tri-X Pan.
Location:
St. Peter’s Basilica, Rome.
Year:
1971.
Collection: Gold.
Print Type: 
Fibre-based Harman Galerie FB Digital.
Printed by:
Metro Imaging.
Limited Editions:
All prints are limited editions, no further prints are produced once sold.
60″ prints / edition of 5
50″ prints / edition of 10
40″ prints / edition of 20
30″ prints / edition of 30
20″ prints / edition of 50
12″ prints / edition of 50
Bespoke: All prints are bespoke and printed to order.
Presentation: 12 and 20 inch prints are titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper, supplied flat in an acid free 4mm 3-ply box for delivery and storage purposes. The boxes are ideal for gift wrapping. The larger 30, 40, 50 and 60 inch prints are also titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper and inserted into a rigid 4mm thick protective cardboard tube for delivery. Metro Imaging based in Central London use an experienced shipping service to deliver the boxed and rolled prints. Metro take great care in ensuring the print(s) are very well protected and efficiently delivered anywhere in the UK or overseas. Acid free tissue paper protects prints from scratching/creasing. Metro also offer a vast array of delivery options to suit the recipient’s preference.
Optional Dry Mounting: Professional Dry Mounting of the larger print sizes can be arranged at an additional cost, the print would then be perfectly flat and ready for framing. However, this makes the overall size very bulky for transporting, so, it may be best for us to send a rolled print directly to your framers and let them carry out the works. You just need to make sure that they are insured as we cannot take responsibility for any damages that may occur.
Certificate of Authenticity: Each print acquired from The Arthur Steel Archive is accompanied by an individually signed Certificate of Authenticity.
Video of Authenticity: Newly printed bespoke prints are further authenticated by way of a short personalised video. Arthur Steel mentions your name on the recording prior to signing. For example, Arthur will say something like: “I’m signing this print of Mick Jagger, edition number 2/20 for Mr. Smith in New York.” For your records, the footage is then sent to you via email.
Watermark: Watermarks will not be present on an original print.
Copyright: © Arthur Steel / The Arthur Steel Archive.

Roman Hat: A cappello romano (literally Roman hat in Italian) or saturno (because its appearance is reminiscent of the ringed planet Saturn) is a hat with a wide, circular brim and a rounded crown worn outdoors in some countries by Catholic clergy, when dressed in a cassock. It is made of either beaver fur or felt, and lined in white silk. Unlike many other articles of ecclesiastical attire, it serves no ceremonial purpose, being primarily a practical item. (The galero is a ceremonial wide brim hat no longer usually worn, though on February 19, 2011, Raymond Cardinal Burke became the first cardinal in recent times to wear (for a single photo) the galero.) The cappello romano is not used in liturgical services. Since the general abandonment of the cassock as street dress, it is uncommon even in Rome today, though it was quite popular there and in some other countries with a Catholic majority population from the 17th century until around 1970. There are some, mostly minor, differences in the designs of cappelli, depending on the rank of the wearer. The pope wears a red cappello with gold cords. Cardinals formerly also had the privilege of wearing a red cappello, but this rule was overturned by Paul VI, and now Cardinals’ cappelli are black, as are those of all other clerics. A cardinal may have a cappello with red and gold cords with scarlet lining. A bishop’s may have green and gold cords with violet lining. A priest may substitute black lining for his. Cappelli for deacons and seminarians have no distinguishing items.

The Vatican: Vatican City, officially Vatican City State or the State of Vatican City, is a walled enclave within the city of Rome. With an area of approximately 44 hectares (110 acres), and a population of 842, it is the smallest state in the world by both area and population. It is an ecclesiastical or sacerdotal-monarchical state ruled by the Bishop of Rome – the Pope. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergy of various national origins. Since the return of the Popes from Avignon in 1377, they have generally resided at the Apostolic Palace within what is now Vatican City, although at times residing instead in the Quirinal Palace in Rome or elsewhere. Vatican City is distinct from the Holy See (Latin: Sancta Sedes), which dates back to early Christianity and is the main episcopal see of 1.2 billion Latin and Eastern Catholic adherents around the globe. The independent city-state, on the other hand, came into existence in 1929 by the Lateran Treaty between the Holy See and Italy, which spoke of it as a new creation, not as a vestige of the much larger Papal States (756–1870), which had previously encompassed much of central Italy. According to the terms of the treaty, the Holy See has “full ownership, exclusive dominion, and sovereign authority and jurisdiction” over the city-state. Within Vatican City are religious and cultural sites such as St. Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel and the Vatican Museums. They feature some of the world’s most famous paintings and sculptures. The unique economy of Vatican City is supported financially by the sale of postage stamps and tourist mementos, fees for admission to museums, and the sale of publications.