HAROLD WILSON | No.10, DOWNING STREET, LONDON 1969

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Description

The Prime Minister Harold Wilson seated at his desk accompanied by Lowry’s ‘Lancashire Fair: Good Friday Daisy Nook (1946)’ painting behind him.

Note: Image unearthed January 2013.

Arthur recalls: “I’d photographed Wilson on many occasions and whenever he was out of the public eye he would smoke cigar’s. As soon as camera’s appeared the cigar would be put out and he’d start smoking a pipe. It was all about image, I also remember that he insisted on wearing a Gannex waterproof overcoat whenever he was photographed outside.”

Camera: Leica 35mm.
Film stock:
 Kodak Tri-X Pan.
Location:
No.10, Downing Street, London.
Year: 1969.
Collection: Gold.
Print Type: Fibre-based Harman Galerie FB Digital.
Printed by: Metro Imaging.
Limited Editions:
All prints are limited editions, no further prints are produced once sold.
60″ prints / edition of 5
50″ prints / edition of 10
40″ prints / edition of 20
30″ prints / edition of 30
20″ prints / edition of 50
12″ prints / edition of 50
Bespoke: All prints are bespoke and printed to order.
Presentation: 12 and 20 inch prints are titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper, supplied flat in an acid free 4mm 3-ply box for delivery and storage purposes. The boxes are ideal for gift wrapping. The larger 30, 40, 50 and 60 inch prints are also titled, numbered, signed and carefully enfolded in acid free tissue paper and inserted into a rigid 4mm thick protective cardboard tube for delivery.
Delivery: Metro Imaging based in Central London use an experienced shipping service to deliver the boxed and rolled prints. Metro take great care in ensuring the print(s) are very well protected and efficiently delivered anywhere in the UK or overseas. Acid free tissue paper protects prints from scratching/creasing. Metro also offer a vast array of delivery options to suit the recipient’s preference.
Optional Dry Mounting: Professional Dry Mounting of the larger print sizes can be arranged at an additional cost, the print would then be perfectly flat and ready for framing. However, this makes the overall size very bulky for transporting, so, it may be best for us to send a rolled print directly to your framers and let them carry out the works. You just need to make sure that they are insured as we cannot take responsibility for any damages that may occur.
Certificate of Authenticity: Each print acquired from The Arthur Steel Archive is accompanied by an individually signed Certificate of Authenticity.
Video of Authenticity: Newly printed bespoke prints are further authenticated by way of a short personalised video. Arthur Steel mentions your name on the recording prior to signing. For example, Arthur will say something like: “I’m signing this print of Mick Jagger, edition number 2/20 for Mr. Smith in New York.” For your records, the footage is then sent to you via email.
Watermark: Watermarks will not be present on an original print.
Copyright: © Arthur Steel / The Arthur Steel Archive.

Biography: James Harold Wilson, Baron Wilson of Rievaulx, KG, OBE, FRS, FSS, PC (11 March 1916 – 24 May 1995) was a British Labour Member of Parliament, Leader of the Labour Party. He was twice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom during the 1960s and 1970s, winning four general elections, including a minority government after the February 1974 General Election resulted in a hung parliament. He is the most recent British Prime Minister to have served non-consecutive terms.
Harold Wilson first served as Prime Minister in the 1960s, during a period of low unemployment and relative economic prosperity (though also of significant problems with the UK’s external balance of payments). His second term in office began in 1974, when a period of economic crisis was beginning to hit most Western countries. On both occasions, economic concerns were to prove a significant constraint on his governments’ ambitions. Wilson’s own approach to socialism placed emphasis on efforts to increase opportunity within society, for example through change and expansion within the education system, allied to the technocratic aim of taking better advantage of rapid scientific progress, rather than on the left’s traditional goal of promoting wider public ownership of industry. While he did not challenge the Party constitution’s stated dedication to nationalisation head-on, he took little action to pursue it. A member of the Labour Party’s “soft left,” Wilson joked about leading a cabinet that was made up mostly of social democrats, comparing himself to a Bolshevik revolutionary presiding over a Tsarist cabinet, but there was arguably little to divide him ideologically from the cabinet majority.
Though generally not at the top of Wilson’s personal areas of priority, his first period in office was notable for substantial legal changes in a number of social areas, including the liberalisation of censorship, divorce, homosexuality, immigration and abortion, as well as the abolition of capital punishment, due in part to the initiatives of backbench MPs who had the support of Roy Jenkins during his time as Home Secretary. Overall, Wilson is seen to have managed a number of difficult political issues with considerable tactical skill, including such potentially divisive issues for his party as the role of public ownership, British membership of the European Community, and the Vietnam War, in which he resisted US pressure to involve Britain and send British troops. Nonetheless, his stated ambition of substantially improving Britain’s long-term economic performance remained largely unfulfilled.